Jul 03, 2022  
2021-2022 Lane Community College Catalog 
    
2021-2022 Lane Community College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Add to Portfolio (opens a new window)

PS 297_H - Environmental Politics-Honors

4 Credit(s)

This course focuses on current environmental problems, alternative frameworks for understanding these problems, and appropriate political responses. Among the problems covered are overpopulation, economic globalization, ozone depletion, the greenhouse effect, bio-colonization, and the depletion of renewable and non-renewable resources. Alternative frameworks considered include the philosophical visions of Deep Ecology and Gaia. These frameworks are used to investigate possible ways to create sustainable economic, political and social systems. Finally, the course focuses on grass roots politics, including groups and social movements actively seeking to promote environmental and social justice. This honors class delves deeper into course topics and requires a high level of student motivation; the pace may be faster than non-honors courses. See lanecc.edu/honors for information. Students cannot receive credit for both PS 297 and PS 297_H.

Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Apply analytical skills to social phenomena in order to understand human behavior. Apply the analytical frameworks of Deep Ecology, GAIA Theory, Traditional Ecological Knowledge, and Eco-feminism to issues of carrying capacity, ecological foot print, economic systems, eco-system resilience, public policy, and political activism
  2. Apply knowledge and experience to foster personal growth and better appreciate the diverse social world in which we live.  The concepts and information provided are designed to be relevant to the everyday lives of students.  This helps students understand and locate themselves in the social world of which they are a part.  This understanding, in turn helps them to develop compassion and understanding for others and the environment
  3. Understand the role of individuals and institutions within the context of society. Students learn that they are integrally interconnected to the society and environment in which they live through the study of philosophical concepts like Gaia Theory; contemporary sciences of ecology and Chaos theory; economic systems that contrast growth based paradigms with Steady State Economics; specific environmental alternatives that recognize this interdependence are studied including local currency, community supported agriculture, Permaculture, bioregionalism, Transition Towns, and relocalization
  4. Assess different theories and concepts, and understand the distinctions between empirical and other methods of inquiry. Students apply the basic concept of carrying capacity and the ecological frameworks of Deep Ecology, Gaia Theory, Traditional Ecological Knowledge, and Eco-feminism to real world practices and problems. This provides students with the tools to empirically and philosophically evaluate the validity and appropriateness of these practices
  5. Utilize appropriate information literacy skills in written and oral communication. Students learn the critical thinking skills of 'immanent critique' and 'deconstruction' to determine if information supports a claim and arguments are internally consistent.  Students are introduced to library research techniques to locate relevant and reliable information.  Students learn the difference between plagiarism and use of sources properly cited in their essay assignments. Students are taught to integrate relevant, appropriately cited information into written assignments in support of the arguments and claims they develop
  6. Understand the diversity of human experience and thought, individually and collectively. This class emphasizes the importance of both cultural and ecological diversity.  Particular emphasis is place on the impact of neo-liberal economic policies on indigenous peoples and on the populations in places where structural adjustment policies impact the ability of people to govern themselves to insure their general welfare. Particular emphasis is also placed on the practices of traditional and contemporary cultures that are ecologically sound
  7. Apply knowledge and skills to contemporary problems and issues.  Students apply the basic concept of carrying capacity and the ecological frameworks of Deep Ecology, Gaia Theory, Traditional Ecological Knowledge, and Eco-feminism to real world practices and problems. Problems and practices examined include neo-liberal economics, peak oil, climate change, genetic engineering, bio-colonization, nano-technology, and the destruction of indigenous lands.  Alternative practices examined include local currency, community supported agriculture, Permaculture, bioregionalism, Transition Towns, and relocalization



Add to Portfolio (opens a new window)