Jul 01, 2022  
2021-2022 Lane Community College Catalog 
    
2021-2022 Lane Community College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

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PH 212 - General Physics with Calculus

5 Credit(s)

PH 212 introduces rotational motion, fluid pressure and Bernoulli's equation, oscillatory motion, and fundamentals of waves and optics. See information about the General Physics with Calculus sequence in the PH 211 course description. The class environment includes labs, demonstrations, discussion, and individual and group activities. Lab included.

Prerequisite: PH 211  and MTH 251  with grades of 'C-' or better;
Corequisite: MTH 252 .

Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

1. Using applicable calculus concepts and creating multiple, appropriate visual and mathematical representations, think, converse and write with significant conceptual precision about rotational motion, fluid dynamics, Special Relativity, vibration and waves, sound, light and optics.

2. Make appropriate decisions, converse and write with significant conceptual precision about measurement, the use of applicable scientific equipment to conduct experimental investigation of translational motion, and the design of experiments and evaluation of results of experiments, and draw conclusions from experiment and calculation about possible explanations involving rotational motion, fluid dynamics, Special Relativity, oscillations, waves, and optics.

3. Formulate questions to move their thinking forward concerning the subject matter of the class and monitor and evaluate their thinking for consistency and reasonableness in the course of study and problem-solving.

4. Appropriately choose and apply explanations involving: classical rotational dynamics, fluid mechanics, Special Relativity, oscillations, waves, and optics.

5. Approach problem-solving in a manner appropriate to physics and to the level needed by beginning physics and engineering majors; they will be aware that this may be significantly different from working through exercises encountered in mathematics classes and perhaps previous science classes; and they will be aware of possible uses and impacts of this physics knowledge.

6. Converse and write about the nature of science with some sophistication and approach the problem-solving in physics as aligned to physics as a science, rather than a body of knowledge.

7. Appreciate that the insights provided by classical rotational dynamics, fluid mechanics, Special Relativity, and elementary explanations of oscillations, waves and optics are valuable and useful, even though physics has developed beyond some of these theories and approaches.



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